Will Brown  Collective
Will Brown Collective

Will Brown is para-curatorial/artist-run experiment whose main objective is to manipulate the structures of exhibition-making as a critical practice. Will Brown is Lindsey WhiteJordan Stein, and David Kasprzak.

Will Brown recently mounted a solo exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive and has realized projects with Kadist Foundation, Wattis Institute, di Rosa, Ulrich Museum of Art, and Southern Exposure.

We are currently working on an exhibition that opens in June 2018 at the Walter McBean Gallery at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Please see www.wearewillbrown.com for ALL our projects

     BRUCE CONNER BRASS HANDLES   A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford  Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.  

 

BRUCE CONNER BRASS HANDLES

A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford

Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.
 

Bruce Conner Brass Handles
Bruce Conner Brass Handles

photo excerpt from the book

A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford

Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.

Bruce Conner Brass Handles
Bruce Conner Brass Handles

A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford

Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.

Matrix 259
Matrix 259

June 12–September 13, 2015
Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Will Brown (a collaborative project of David Kasprzak, Jordan Stein, and Lindsey White) re-imagines the roles of artist and curator through an inventive upending of traditional exhibition formats and often mines unexpected or forgotten histories within the cultural sphere. MATRIX 259, which unfolds across various locations, takes its inspiration from a 1978 site-specific Dan Flavin installation at BAM/PFA and the enigmatic stories surrounding it. Will Brown builds upon the sense of myth and transience of Flavin’s work for each of the elements of MATRIX 259.

Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum
Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum

June 12–September 13, 2015
Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Will Brown’s MATRIX exhibition unfolds across various sites outside BAMPFA’s Mario Ciampi building: an artist book displayed in UC Berkeley’s Morrison Library; a seemingly abandoned car sited in front of the now closed Bancroft Way entrance to BAMPFA; a light installation on the roof of the building; and a one-night theatrical production written by poet and playwright Kevin Killian, which will take place at the exhibition’s opening.

Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum
Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum

Will Brown’s MATRIX exhibition unfolds across various sites outside BAMPFA’s Mario Ciampi building: an artist book displayed in UC Berkeley’s Morrison Library; a seemingly abandoned car sited in front of the now closed Bancroft Way entrance to BAMPFA; a light installation on the roof of the building; and a one-night theatrical production written by poet and playwright Kevin Killian, which will take place at the exhibition’s opening.

New Light on Riboflavin
New Light on Riboflavin

Will Brown commissioned playwright, Kevin Killian to write a play for Matrix 259 at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. The play, "New Light on Riboflavin" was performed at the opening reception. See video footage here

 

Berkeley, on the eve of Dan Flavin's historic exhibition, a classic car crashes into the walls of Mario Ciampi's Brutalist University Art Museum. From the rubble a lone figure emerges, determined to make use of Berkeley's brain power and fabled social justice to invent a new vitamin to help cure polio. In a subplot the newly invented fluorescent light threatens to make obsolete the old fashioned electric lightbulb of Thomas Edison.

Bruce Conner's Metaphysical Services
Bruce Conner's Metaphysical Services

BRUCE CONNER'S METAPHYSICAL SERVICES: THIS IS A BRUCE CONNER EXHIBITION is made possible by di Rosa and runs concurrently with INHERENT VICE: THIS IS NOT A BRUCE CONNER EXHIBITION on view in Napa, CA through April 6, 2014. Will Brown wishes to thank di Rosa curator Amy Owen for commissioning these interrelated projects. Check Will Brown website for more info

Ether
Ether

Walter and McBean Galleries at San Francisco Art Institute, 2018

Generously funded by: Creative Work Fund &

National Endowment for the Arts

https://www.sfai.edu/exhibitions-public-events/detail/will-brown-ether

n the late 1970s, San Francisco Art Institute rediscovered a long-lost collection of Eadweard Muybridge photographs hidden within its institutional archive. More than a century before, the English artist had presented the first ever public showing of moving pictures on campus and apparently left something behind. The decision was made to auction the materials to finance the creation of a department focused on the nascent fields of video and performance art, now known as New Genres. The Muybridge sale boldly wagered the future of new media against the history of the moving image, a speculative maneuver establishing the material conditions for faculty and students to test the limits of contemporary art. The sale also served to affirm the school’s quixotic belief that experimentation would somehow, even accidentally, provide.

While the story confirms art education’s inherently precarious footing with regards to the marketplace, New Genres has produced some of the most important artists in recent memory. In other words, it worked. Despite this success, four decades later SFAI faces low enrollment, increasing costs of deferred maintenance, and attendant budget cuts as one of the last exclusively “fine arts” colleges remaining in the United States. Will Brown—a collaborative group that includes SFAI alumni and current faculty—and this developing project were affected by these conditions, including the dismemberment of an ambitious Exhibitions and Public Programs department that has provided a vital forum for art and artists across the last half-century. Cast against the backdrop of a tech-fueled Bay Area, where the cost of living has skyrocketed in step with emergent technologies, one fears the new “creative class” alone will set the terms of creativity’s valuation and professionalization.

This project complicates the relationship between vision and capital by questioning how notions of value are substantiated via fantasy, risk, and failure. It is essential that we address the complex debt-driven code that underwrites all education, not just arts education, and work to stabilize the price of the ticket before access becomes increasingly rarefied.

For these reasons, we have invested the remainder of our allotted exhibition budget in Ether, a cryptocurrency that acts as fuel for operating the distributed application platform Ethereum. Digital currencies like Ether use complex encryption techniques to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, circulating independently of a central bank. The philosophy behind cryptocurrency is arguably both utopian and dystopian; it exists based on a distrust of centralized government and financial systems, predicting their eventual collapse, while simultaneously representing a collective effort to survive such a collapse by creating a financially sustainable economy in the hands of citizens.

At irregular intervals and in unfixed amounts, any profits over the initial investment will be redirected into SFAI student, staff, or faculty projects — an unmediated re-investment in the artistic mission of the school. That said, the crypto-marketplace is such that gain is often preamble to loss. The value of our buy will be monitored by an accompanying mobile application that doubles as a grant application portal. With concern, we have responded in real time by creating a kind of perverted and complicit artistic autonomy; we do and don’t hope it pays off.

-Will Brown


Ether Brown Grant
Ether Brown Grant

www.etherbrown.com

Ether Brown tracks the value of an award open to current members of the San Francisco Art Institute community, including students, faculty, and staff. Distributed on an irregular basis at unfixed amounts, the award is available to support projects of any and every variety. The award’s seed fund is an investment by Will Brown in Ether, a digital cryptocurrency that acts as fuel for operating the application platform Ethereum. As assets from the closely monitored account are pulled above initial investment, registered users will receive notification that applications are open. We urge you to register and apply.


City of Busappearances
City of Busappearances

Commissioned by Wattis Institute and Kadist Foundation. Featuring artists Irwin Swirnoff, Leslie Shows, and Anthony Discenza. Plus special guest Google programmer Will H. Brown (seriously)

The infamous "Google Bus" has become synonymous with the changing face of San Francisco by chauffeuring SF-based employees to and from Silicon Valley jobs everyday. CoB is a bus tour in the format of a talk show that traces the unpublished route of the infamous bus through the city with "participants" serving as the live studio audience. From onboard the CoB bus, our conversation will explore the current cultural, financial, and artistic climate of the city. CoB concludes at Will Brown with a special finale inside the related exhibition, Supreme Condominium.

Supreme Condominium
Supreme Condominium

WILL BROWN'S SUPREME CONDOMINIUM EXHIBITION

Inspired by a true story of Kasimir Malevich's burial site being paved over to build a condo in Moscow.

Supreme Condominium
Supreme Condominium

Will Brown turns storefront into a luxury condominium 

Supreme Condominium
Supreme Condominium
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art

As assistant to SFMOMA Director Henry Hopkins, Alberta Mayo turned her office -- his waiting room -- into a delightfully delinquent treasure known as the Manitoba Museum of Art. Decades after the physical space closed its doors, Will Brown is pleased to present the complete holdings of MMOFA, including artworks (found and made), ephemera, correspondence, and an extensive army of moose-themed objects.

Manitoba Museum of Finds Art
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art

Highlights include: mirror submitted by Bruce Conner for the first ever Bruce Conner Look Alike Contest and Bake Sale; atomic bomb hotpad; glass jar of cotton balls used to clean Jean Arp sculpture; glow in the dark MMOFA key chain; pencil used by Sol Lewitt to make MMOFA wall drawing; tree bark with carved initials; Henry Hopkins' rolodexes; fake butter; fake teeth; small flocked moose; burnt package for Henry Hopkins (never opened); mature discretion sign; Clyfford Still drawing; diploma; Lynn Hershman's "game"; 4th Annual Chloe Footstar Potluck Memorial Picnic Announcement; special members gift; fashion advertisement photographed in Rauschenberg retrospective with Tyrone Brue, security guard, signed by Tyrone.

Illegitimate Business
Illegitimate Business

Will Brown is pleased to present its inaugural exhibition, Illegitimate Business. This exhibition of artworks and ephemera with peculiar provenance investigates the ways in which works of art are acquired outside of galleries and auction houses. The eclectic collection of objects, from some of the world’s most revered artists, have one thing in common—they have all been obtained without any monetary transaction, and often illicitly. Illegitimate Business explores the life of an artwork after it leaves the artist’s hands and posits that the value of a work, removed from the market, is perhaps most evident in the narrative of its acquisition. We would like to thank all of our lenders, who for obvious reasons will remain anonymous.

The Ghost of James Lee Byars
The Ghost of James Lee Byars

For five weeks, Will Brown restages The Ghost of James Lee Byars, the artist’s seminal 1969 work; a completely lightless environment. Inside The Ghost of James Lee Byars, Will Brown hosts a comprehensive collection of the artist’s work.

 At 6PM, 10 artists will set out on foot from their respective homes and walk to Will Brown. Departing from disparate corners of the Bay Area, participants will arrive in a staggered procession throughout the course of the evening. The physical space will be empty of art. Beer and wine will be served. We hope to see you there.

At 6PM, 10 artists will set out on foot from their respective homes and walk to Will Brown. Departing from disparate corners of the Bay Area, participants will arrive in a staggered procession throughout the course of the evening. The physical space will be empty of art. Beer and wine will be served. We hope to see you there.

Untitled Black Painting
Untitled Black Painting

Will Brown is pleased to present Untitled (Black Painting), a history of black monochromatic painting in the form of a present tense negation; an absolute inversion of the white cube gallery. On the walls of our black, objectless installation hover white outlines of the most important black monochromes since 1915. True to scale and too large to fit comfortably in our space, the edges of the original works overlap, ultimately becoming engulfed by the edges of the physical exhibition space. Under the circumstances, the specific objects in question become the plaster, the moulding, the piping, and the ceiling. In wrestling with real estate rather than canvas, Untitled (Black Painting) explores the struggle between the loftily idealistic and acutely concrete at the heart of realizing a contemporary non-commercial exhibition venue.

THAT POSSUM HAS BEEN HERE SINCE THE BEGINNING
THAT POSSUM HAS BEEN HERE SINCE THE BEGINNING

THAT POSSUM is the culmination of Will Brown's two-month stay as an artist-in-residence at Headlands. The exhibition is on view in conjunction with the Headlands' seasonal Open House, an afternoon of live events, more than 30 open artist's studios, and delicious food prepared on-site by the Headlands chef.

Join Will Brown for a one-day exhibition exploring the eccentric and extraordinary institutional memory of Headlands Center for the Arts, using interviews with long-time staffer Holly Blake as a starting point for several experimental displays and situations.

Baunshaus
Baunshaus

Bauhaus Baunshaus was commissioned by Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts on the occasion of Capp Street Project's 30th birthday party.

ill Brown was one of two "artists" commissioned to create new work for the occasion. Special thanks to Jesi Khadivi, Anthony Huberman, and Happy Jump.

Will Brown  Collective
     BRUCE CONNER BRASS HANDLES   A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford  Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.  
Bruce Conner Brass Handles
Bruce Conner Brass Handles
Matrix 259
Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum
Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum
New Light on Riboflavin
Bruce Conner's Metaphysical Services
Ether
Ether Brown Grant
City of Busappearances
Supreme Condominium
Supreme Condominium
Supreme Condominium
Supreme Condominium
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art
Illegitimate Business
The Ghost of James Lee Byars
 At 6PM, 10 artists will set out on foot from their respective homes and walk to Will Brown. Departing from disparate corners of the Bay Area, participants will arrive in a staggered procession throughout the course of the evening. The physical space will be empty of art. Beer and wine will be served. We hope to see you there.
Untitled Black Painting
THAT POSSUM HAS BEEN HERE SINCE THE BEGINNING
Baunshaus
Will Brown Collective

Will Brown is para-curatorial/artist-run experiment whose main objective is to manipulate the structures of exhibition-making as a critical practice. Will Brown is Lindsey WhiteJordan Stein, and David Kasprzak.

Will Brown recently mounted a solo exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive and has realized projects with Kadist Foundation, Wattis Institute, di Rosa, Ulrich Museum of Art, and Southern Exposure.

We are currently working on an exhibition that opens in June 2018 at the Walter McBean Gallery at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Please see www.wearewillbrown.com for ALL our projects

 

BRUCE CONNER BRASS HANDLES

A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford

Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.
 

Bruce Conner Brass Handles

photo excerpt from the book

A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford

Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.

Bruce Conner Brass Handles

A project by Will Brown (Lindsey White, Jordan Stein, David Kasprzak). Text by Jean Conner, Photographs by Jason Fulford

Artist and filmmaker Bruce Conner’s (1933–2008) mobility was severely limited for the last five years of his life, when he rarely left the San Francisco home he shared with his wife, Jean. To aid in his physical navigation of its spaces, he worked with assistants to install a succession of solid brass handles in each and every room--surrounding the stove, down the boat-like stairwell, inside the recesses of the bedroom closet. At last count, the handles, a labyrinth of critical support, numbered 163.

Matrix 259

June 12–September 13, 2015
Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Will Brown (a collaborative project of David Kasprzak, Jordan Stein, and Lindsey White) re-imagines the roles of artist and curator through an inventive upending of traditional exhibition formats and often mines unexpected or forgotten histories within the cultural sphere. MATRIX 259, which unfolds across various locations, takes its inspiration from a 1978 site-specific Dan Flavin installation at BAM/PFA and the enigmatic stories surrounding it. Will Brown builds upon the sense of myth and transience of Flavin’s work for each of the elements of MATRIX 259.

Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum

June 12–September 13, 2015
Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Will Brown’s MATRIX exhibition unfolds across various sites outside BAMPFA’s Mario Ciampi building: an artist book displayed in UC Berkeley’s Morrison Library; a seemingly abandoned car sited in front of the now closed Bancroft Way entrance to BAMPFA; a light installation on the roof of the building; and a one-night theatrical production written by poet and playwright Kevin Killian, which will take place at the exhibition’s opening.

Matrix 259 Berkeley Art Museum

Will Brown’s MATRIX exhibition unfolds across various sites outside BAMPFA’s Mario Ciampi building: an artist book displayed in UC Berkeley’s Morrison Library; a seemingly abandoned car sited in front of the now closed Bancroft Way entrance to BAMPFA; a light installation on the roof of the building; and a one-night theatrical production written by poet and playwright Kevin Killian, which will take place at the exhibition’s opening.

New Light on Riboflavin

Will Brown commissioned playwright, Kevin Killian to write a play for Matrix 259 at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. The play, "New Light on Riboflavin" was performed at the opening reception. See video footage here

 

Berkeley, on the eve of Dan Flavin's historic exhibition, a classic car crashes into the walls of Mario Ciampi's Brutalist University Art Museum. From the rubble a lone figure emerges, determined to make use of Berkeley's brain power and fabled social justice to invent a new vitamin to help cure polio. In a subplot the newly invented fluorescent light threatens to make obsolete the old fashioned electric lightbulb of Thomas Edison.

Bruce Conner's Metaphysical Services

BRUCE CONNER'S METAPHYSICAL SERVICES: THIS IS A BRUCE CONNER EXHIBITION is made possible by di Rosa and runs concurrently with INHERENT VICE: THIS IS NOT A BRUCE CONNER EXHIBITION on view in Napa, CA through April 6, 2014. Will Brown wishes to thank di Rosa curator Amy Owen for commissioning these interrelated projects. Check Will Brown website for more info

Ether

Walter and McBean Galleries at San Francisco Art Institute, 2018

Generously funded by: Creative Work Fund &

National Endowment for the Arts

https://www.sfai.edu/exhibitions-public-events/detail/will-brown-ether

n the late 1970s, San Francisco Art Institute rediscovered a long-lost collection of Eadweard Muybridge photographs hidden within its institutional archive. More than a century before, the English artist had presented the first ever public showing of moving pictures on campus and apparently left something behind. The decision was made to auction the materials to finance the creation of a department focused on the nascent fields of video and performance art, now known as New Genres. The Muybridge sale boldly wagered the future of new media against the history of the moving image, a speculative maneuver establishing the material conditions for faculty and students to test the limits of contemporary art. The sale also served to affirm the school’s quixotic belief that experimentation would somehow, even accidentally, provide.

While the story confirms art education’s inherently precarious footing with regards to the marketplace, New Genres has produced some of the most important artists in recent memory. In other words, it worked. Despite this success, four decades later SFAI faces low enrollment, increasing costs of deferred maintenance, and attendant budget cuts as one of the last exclusively “fine arts” colleges remaining in the United States. Will Brown—a collaborative group that includes SFAI alumni and current faculty—and this developing project were affected by these conditions, including the dismemberment of an ambitious Exhibitions and Public Programs department that has provided a vital forum for art and artists across the last half-century. Cast against the backdrop of a tech-fueled Bay Area, where the cost of living has skyrocketed in step with emergent technologies, one fears the new “creative class” alone will set the terms of creativity’s valuation and professionalization.

This project complicates the relationship between vision and capital by questioning how notions of value are substantiated via fantasy, risk, and failure. It is essential that we address the complex debt-driven code that underwrites all education, not just arts education, and work to stabilize the price of the ticket before access becomes increasingly rarefied.

For these reasons, we have invested the remainder of our allotted exhibition budget in Ether, a cryptocurrency that acts as fuel for operating the distributed application platform Ethereum. Digital currencies like Ether use complex encryption techniques to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, circulating independently of a central bank. The philosophy behind cryptocurrency is arguably both utopian and dystopian; it exists based on a distrust of centralized government and financial systems, predicting their eventual collapse, while simultaneously representing a collective effort to survive such a collapse by creating a financially sustainable economy in the hands of citizens.

At irregular intervals and in unfixed amounts, any profits over the initial investment will be redirected into SFAI student, staff, or faculty projects — an unmediated re-investment in the artistic mission of the school. That said, the crypto-marketplace is such that gain is often preamble to loss. The value of our buy will be monitored by an accompanying mobile application that doubles as a grant application portal. With concern, we have responded in real time by creating a kind of perverted and complicit artistic autonomy; we do and don’t hope it pays off.

-Will Brown


Ether Brown Grant

www.etherbrown.com

Ether Brown tracks the value of an award open to current members of the San Francisco Art Institute community, including students, faculty, and staff. Distributed on an irregular basis at unfixed amounts, the award is available to support projects of any and every variety. The award’s seed fund is an investment by Will Brown in Ether, a digital cryptocurrency that acts as fuel for operating the application platform Ethereum. As assets from the closely monitored account are pulled above initial investment, registered users will receive notification that applications are open. We urge you to register and apply.


City of Busappearances

Commissioned by Wattis Institute and Kadist Foundation. Featuring artists Irwin Swirnoff, Leslie Shows, and Anthony Discenza. Plus special guest Google programmer Will H. Brown (seriously)

The infamous "Google Bus" has become synonymous with the changing face of San Francisco by chauffeuring SF-based employees to and from Silicon Valley jobs everyday. CoB is a bus tour in the format of a talk show that traces the unpublished route of the infamous bus through the city with "participants" serving as the live studio audience. From onboard the CoB bus, our conversation will explore the current cultural, financial, and artistic climate of the city. CoB concludes at Will Brown with a special finale inside the related exhibition, Supreme Condominium.

Supreme Condominium

WILL BROWN'S SUPREME CONDOMINIUM EXHIBITION

Inspired by a true story of Kasimir Malevich's burial site being paved over to build a condo in Moscow.

Supreme Condominium

Will Brown turns storefront into a luxury condominium 

Supreme Condominium
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art

As assistant to SFMOMA Director Henry Hopkins, Alberta Mayo turned her office -- his waiting room -- into a delightfully delinquent treasure known as the Manitoba Museum of Art. Decades after the physical space closed its doors, Will Brown is pleased to present the complete holdings of MMOFA, including artworks (found and made), ephemera, correspondence, and an extensive army of moose-themed objects.

Manitoba Museum of Finds Art

Highlights include: mirror submitted by Bruce Conner for the first ever Bruce Conner Look Alike Contest and Bake Sale; atomic bomb hotpad; glass jar of cotton balls used to clean Jean Arp sculpture; glow in the dark MMOFA key chain; pencil used by Sol Lewitt to make MMOFA wall drawing; tree bark with carved initials; Henry Hopkins' rolodexes; fake butter; fake teeth; small flocked moose; burnt package for Henry Hopkins (never opened); mature discretion sign; Clyfford Still drawing; diploma; Lynn Hershman's "game"; 4th Annual Chloe Footstar Potluck Memorial Picnic Announcement; special members gift; fashion advertisement photographed in Rauschenberg retrospective with Tyrone Brue, security guard, signed by Tyrone.

Illegitimate Business

Will Brown is pleased to present its inaugural exhibition, Illegitimate Business. This exhibition of artworks and ephemera with peculiar provenance investigates the ways in which works of art are acquired outside of galleries and auction houses. The eclectic collection of objects, from some of the world’s most revered artists, have one thing in common—they have all been obtained without any monetary transaction, and often illicitly. Illegitimate Business explores the life of an artwork after it leaves the artist’s hands and posits that the value of a work, removed from the market, is perhaps most evident in the narrative of its acquisition. We would like to thank all of our lenders, who for obvious reasons will remain anonymous.

The Ghost of James Lee Byars

For five weeks, Will Brown restages The Ghost of James Lee Byars, the artist’s seminal 1969 work; a completely lightless environment. Inside The Ghost of James Lee Byars, Will Brown hosts a comprehensive collection of the artist’s work.

At 6PM, 10 artists will set out on foot from their respective homes and walk to Will Brown. Departing from disparate corners of the Bay Area, participants will arrive in a staggered procession throughout the course of the evening. The physical space will be empty of art. Beer and wine will be served. We hope to see you there.

Untitled Black Painting

Will Brown is pleased to present Untitled (Black Painting), a history of black monochromatic painting in the form of a present tense negation; an absolute inversion of the white cube gallery. On the walls of our black, objectless installation hover white outlines of the most important black monochromes since 1915. True to scale and too large to fit comfortably in our space, the edges of the original works overlap, ultimately becoming engulfed by the edges of the physical exhibition space. Under the circumstances, the specific objects in question become the plaster, the moulding, the piping, and the ceiling. In wrestling with real estate rather than canvas, Untitled (Black Painting) explores the struggle between the loftily idealistic and acutely concrete at the heart of realizing a contemporary non-commercial exhibition venue.

THAT POSSUM HAS BEEN HERE SINCE THE BEGINNING

THAT POSSUM is the culmination of Will Brown's two-month stay as an artist-in-residence at Headlands. The exhibition is on view in conjunction with the Headlands' seasonal Open House, an afternoon of live events, more than 30 open artist's studios, and delicious food prepared on-site by the Headlands chef.

Join Will Brown for a one-day exhibition exploring the eccentric and extraordinary institutional memory of Headlands Center for the Arts, using interviews with long-time staffer Holly Blake as a starting point for several experimental displays and situations.

Baunshaus

Bauhaus Baunshaus was commissioned by Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts on the occasion of Capp Street Project's 30th birthday party.

ill Brown was one of two "artists" commissioned to create new work for the occasion. Special thanks to Jesi Khadivi, Anthony Huberman, and Happy Jump.

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